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Burns in the Airline Industry

Lawyers for Workers’ Compensation Claims in Chicago

Burns in the airline industry can be disabling. If you have been burned while on the job in the airline industry, you may be able to obtain workers' compensation benefits. The workers' compensation system is supposed to make it easier for workers to obtain money to address their medical bills and lost wages than it would be to file a lawsuit. However, in practice, it can be difficult to obtain benefits, and an experienced Chicago workers' compensation attorney can help you navigate the claims process.

Burns

Burns can be different in terms of type and degree. Generally, first-degree burns are mild and affect the outer layer of skin. Second-degree burns impact both the epidermis and the layer of skin beneath that. This kind of burn causes redness, pain, swelling and blistering. Third degree burns are those that affect deeper tissues. If you have a third degree burn your skin may turn white or black and may be numb. Burns can be very painful and leave scars. Burns can also cause heart attacks or shock.

There are many different potential causes of burn injuries on a flight including hot liquids, steam, dry heat, heated objects, electricity, and chemicals. Thermal burns occur if scalding liquid comes into contact with your skin. For example, if you are making coffee for a passenger and it is burning hot and splashes on your hand, you may suffer second-degree burns. Burns should be treated right away.

Burns in the Airline Industry

Even if your supervisor or manager saw you get burned, you should provide written notice to your employer that you suffered a work-related injury. You have 45 days to provide this notice. Once you notify your employer that you suffered burns that are work-related, the employer should give you a list of approved medical providers. It should also let its insurer know to start the claims process. If your burns caused you to be unable to work for more than 3 days, your employer is required to accept your claim and pay temporary disability benefits within 14 days or provide you with a written explanation for its denial or delay within the same period.

Within 30 days of receiving your notification of burn injuries that caused you to be unable to work for more than 3 days, your employer should file an accident report with the Illinois Workers' Compensation Commission.

If you need the Commission to order your employer to pay you benefits for burn injuries, you need to file a claim. It can be helpful to file a claim whenever you believe your employer may not pay you your full benefits in the future. For example, if you anticipate that you'll need revision surgery for the scars resulting from your burns and believe your employer may not pay for this, you may want to file a claim so that you can get a hearing more quickly than you would without a claim. A skilled work injury lawyer can help you with this process.

Workers' compensation claims may be denied due to a worker's failure to notify an employer of burn injuries within 45 days, or due to an employee's failure to show that the burn injury arose in the course of employment. When an employer denies your timely claim for work-related burn injuries, you can petition the Illinois Workers' Compensation Commission to review your case. A hearing will be held and your claim will be determined. If you disagree with the outcome, you have the right to appeal.

Consult a Skillful Workers' Compensation Attorney in Chicago

If you have suffered burns in the airline industry in Chicago, an experienced workers' compensation lawyer can help you seek benefits. Our firm has helped injured airline workers in areas including Springfield, Aurora, Champaign, Quincy, and Rockford, as well as other communities in Kane, Winnebago, Cook, Sangamon, Champaign, and Adams Counties. We look at your case carefully to make sure we address all areas of potential relief, whether you have a claim for workers' compensation, personal injury, or both. We can be reached at (312) 263-6330 or toll free at (800) 444-1525, or via our online form.